State Law > Louisiana > Louisiana Meal and Rest Period Law

Louisiana Meal and Rest Period Law

 

Louisiana's law regarding meal and rest provisions for employees can be found in the following sections of the Louisiana Revised Statutes.

Title 23 213. Recreation or meal period

No minor shall be employed, permitted, or suffered to work for any five-hour period without one interval of at least thirty minutes within such period for meals. If the period of work before the interval exceeds five hours by less than fifteen minutes, that difference shall be considered de minimis and shall not be considered a violation of this Section. Such interval shall not be included as part of the working hours of the day. This interval shall be thirty minutes. Any difference in length of the interval less than fifteen minutes shall be considered de minimis and shall not be considered a violation of this Section.

486. Minimum rest interval.

The minimum rest interval in open air between shifts shall be:

Normal pressure to eighteen pounds per square inch, eighteen pounds to twenty-six pounds, one hour; twenty-six pounds to thirty-three pounds, two hours; thirty-three pounds to thirty-eight pounds, three hours; thirty-eight pounds to forty-three pounds, four hours; forty-three pounds to forty-eight pounds, five hours; forty-eight pounds to fifty pounds, six hours.

Title 32 1524. For-hire motor carriers transporting railroad employees, Drive time requirements.

A. When used in this Section, the following words and phrases shall have the following meanings, unless the context clearly indicates a different meaning:

(1) "Driving time" means all time spent at the driving controls of a commercial for-hire vehicle designed to transport railroad employees.

(2) "Eight consecutive days" means the period of eight consecutive days beginning on any day and time designated by the for-hire carrier for the terminal from which the driver is normally dispatched.

(3) "For-hire carrier" means any motor carrier engaged in the business of transporting railroad employees for compensation.

(4) "On-duty time" means all time from the time a driver begins to work or is required to be in readiness to work until the time the driver is relieved from work and all responsibility for performing work. On-duty time shall include:

(a) All time at a plant, terminal, facility, or other property of a motor carrier or shipper, or on any other property waiting to be dispatched, unless the driver has been relieved from duty by the for-hire carrier.

(b) All time inspecting, servicing, or conditioning any for-hire commercial motor vehicle at any time.

(c) All driving time as defined in the term driving time.

(d) All time, other than driving, in or upon any for-hire commercial motor vehicle.

(e) All time loading or unloading a for-hire commercial motor vehicle, supervising, or assisting in the loading or unloading, attending a for-hire commercial motor vehicle being loaded or unloaded, remain in readiness to operate the for-hire commercial motor vehicle, or in giving or receiving receipts for shipments loaded or unloaded.

(f) All time repairing, obtaining assistance, or remaining in attendance upon a disabled for-hire commercial motor vehicle.

(g) All time spent providing a breath sample or urine specimen, including travel time to and from the collection site, in order to comply with any federal, state, or employer regulation or rule.

(h) Performing any other work in the capacity, employ, or service of a motor carrier.

(5) "Twenty-four-hour period" means any twenty-four consecutive hour period beginning at the time designated by the for-hire carrier for the terminal from which the driver is normally dispatched. The times designated for the beginning of a twenty-four-hour period and eight consecutive days shall be the same.

B. The provisions of this Section shall apply only to for-hire carriers designed to transport railroad employees on any public highway or road in this state.

C. Drivers of for-hire motor carrier vehicles transporting railroad employees shall be prohibited from:

(1) Driving a for-hire vehicle for more than ten hours in any twenty-four-hour period without eight consecutive hours off duty.

(2) Driving a for-hire vehicle after the driver has been on duty for fifteen hours without eight consecutive hours off duty.

(3) Driving a for-hire vehicle after the driver has been on duty for a total of seventy hours within eight consecutive days until the beginning of the next eight consecutive days.

(4) Performing any compensated work for a person who is not a motor carrier within eight hours prior to coming on duty.

D. For-hire motor carrier companies shall keep time records for six months indicating the time all for-hire motor carrier drivers report for duty, the time of relief from duty, hours driven, hours on duty, and hours off duty. The records shall be made available to the Department of Public Safety and Corrections, office of state police, for inspection and shall be subject to the provisions of R.S. 32:1505.

E. The Department of Public Safety and Corrections, office of state police, shall adopt rules and regulations, in accordance with the Administrative Procedure Act, as are necessary to implement the provisions of this Section.

Title 51 2247.1. Breastfeeding rights; Practices prohibited.

A. Legislative findings and declarations.

(1) The Legislature of Louisiana hereby finds that the surgeon general of the United States recommends that babies from birth to one year of age be breastfed, unless medically contraindicated, in order for the babies to attain an optimal healthy start in life, but that despite that recommendation, statistics reveal a declining percentage of mothers who are now choosing to breastfeed their babies, and nearly half of all new mothers are choosing formula over breastfeeding before they even leave the hospital.

(2) The legislature further finds that breast milk provides better nutrition and more immunity to disease, is easier for babies to digest, and may raise a baby's intelligence quotient, but that the social constraints of modern society work against the choice of breastfeeding and lead new mothers with demanding time schedules to opt for formula feeding for reasons such as embarrassment and the fear of social ostracism or criminal prosecution.

(3) The legislature does hereby declare that the promotion of family values and infant health demands that our society put an end to the vicious cycle of embarrassment and ignorance that constricts women and men alike on the subject of breastfeeding, and that in a genuine effort to promote family values, our society should encourage public acceptance of this most basic act of nurture between mother and baby and should take appropriate steps to ensure that no mother is made to feel incriminated or socially ostracized for breastfeeding her baby.

B. Right to breastfeed.

Notwithstanding any other provision of law to the contrary, a mother may breastfeed her baby in any place of public accommodation, resort, or amusement.

C. "Discriminatory practice in connection with public accommodations"

To include a discriminatory practice against a mother breastfeeding her baby. Any direct or indirect act or practice of exclusion, distinction, restriction, segregation, limitation, refusal, denial, or any other act or practice of differentiation or preference in the treatment of a mother breastfeeding her baby shall be a "discriminatory practice in connection with public accommodations" for the purposes of this Chapter.

D. Breastfeeding; discriminatory practices prohibited.

It is a discriminatory practice in connection with public accommodations for a person to deny an individual the full and equal enjoyment of the goods, services, facilities, privileges, advantages, and accommodations of a place of public accommodation, resort, or amusement, as defined in this Chapter, on the grounds that the individual is a mother breastfeeding her baby. This discriminatory practice in connection with public accommodations is prohibited.

E. Breastfeeding not a violation of law.

A mother breastfeeding her baby in any location, public or private, where the mother is otherwise authorized to be, shall not be deemed to be in violation of R.S. 14:106 or of any other provision of law.

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